Category Archives: Oceanic

A Diamond Jubilee for Line P

“In a time when you can work on Line P data without actually being to sea, who here has been to Station Papa?” About 2/3 of the hands in ~100 person room go up. “Who’s been since 2000?” 40 hands. “Who went in the 90’s?” 20 hands. “In the 80’s?” 10 hands. ” In the 70’s?” 5 hands. “In the 60’s?” Still, 2 hands go up. “Who’s been in winter?” 15 hands up, a hearty “Thank You!” and a round of applause from the room.

This was the amazing group that I was surrounded by at the two day meeting celebrating 60 years of science on Line P at the Institute of Ocean Sciences in Sidney, BC the last grey days of November, 2016. In this room sat some of the great forethinking oceanographers of a generation that have tirelessly pushed for continued funding, and collected samples, at what is now the longest continuously monitored station in the entire global ocean. Continue reading A Diamond Jubilee for Line P

September 2016 InFORMal Update

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Oceanic Monitoring: 

The suite of summer 2015 oceanic data are now ready and they show quite a change from 2014. Comparing these data side by side, it is plain to see that the concentrations of 137Cs have increased considerably in the central NE Pacific. It appears that the plume has spread throughout this vast area from Alaska to California. While natural processes of radioactive decay are slowly decreasing concentrations of 134Cs (with a 2 year half-life roughly 25% of the original concentration was present in April 2015), the signal for 137Cs is getting smeared by the currents of the NE Pacific and as they paint the path of the highest flows. For the sampling details and to see the values for 134Cs, see the interactive map. Continue reading September 2016 InFORMal Update

PHOTOS: Walk the Line, P: Inspiration

by Sara Zeidan

Me and the trusty CCGS John P Tully.
Me and the trusty CCGS John P Tully.

After two weeks straight of living on a boat I have finally touched solid ground! I could not help but naturally sway from side to side as I walked along the port of the Institute of Ocean Sciences, seems I am more prone to land sickness than sea sickness. Continue reading PHOTOS: Walk the Line, P: Inspiration