All posts by dr.jonathan.kellogg

Hypothesis Confirmed: Sea Lion Mass Deaths Caused by Malnutrition

by Alastair Bland
August 2, 2017
Originally published by Hakai Magazine

Meteorologists had never seen anything quite like it—a mass of abnormally warm surface water that overwhelmed much of the northeastern Pacific Ocean for three years starting in late 2013. They called it the Blob.

Within months, thousands of starving sea lion pups began washing ashore along the west coast of the United States. Continue reading Hypothesis Confirmed: Sea Lion Mass Deaths Caused by Malnutrition

Cruising Big Blue ’17: Caffeine and Bittersweet Farewells

by Annaliese Meyer

27-Jul-2017
48° 27’ 43.6” N 123° 18’ 32.8” W

1050 hours: A good night’s sleep and several cups of coffee later, I’ve made it back to the office at UVic. I’ve already succeeding in getting sunburned in the half-day I’ve been home and I’m somewhat pleased with that fact. Despite the midnight sun we sailed with for the last couple weeks, it’s been a while since we’ve had any sort of heat. It’s almost like we were in the Arctic or something. Weird.  Continue reading Cruising Big Blue ’17: Caffeine and Bittersweet Farewells

Possible Melted Fuel Seen for First Time at Fukushima Plant

by Mari Yamaguchi
July 21, 2017
Originally published by the Associated Press

TOKYO (AP) — An underwater robot captured images of solidified lava-like rocks Friday inside a damaged reactor at Japan’s crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, spotting for the first time what is believed to be nuclear fuel that melted six years ago. Continue reading Possible Melted Fuel Seen for First Time at Fukushima Plant

Sea cave preserves 5,000-year snapshot of tsunamis

Rutgers University
July 19, 2017
Originally published by EurekAlert!

An international team of scientists digging in a sea cave in Indonesia has discovered the world’s most pristine record of tsunamis, a 5,000-year-old sedimentary snapshot that reveals for the first time how little is known about when earthquakes trigger massive waves. Continue reading Sea cave preserves 5,000-year snapshot of tsunamis