Tag Archives: Smith

Summer 2014 Offshore Monitoring for Fukushima Contamination

By Jonathan Kellogg and Jay T. Cullen

Results from surface water samples collected in August 2014 during three oceanic research cruises are now available. These seawater samples were analyzed to characterize the distribution of Fukushima derived radionuclides 137-Cesium (137Cs half life ~30 years), and 134-Cesium (134Cs half life ~2 years). Based on the distribution of 134Cs, the Fukushima plume was not consistently present yet on the BC coast. It is likely that peak concentrations of radiocesium will be present offshore in the next year.

Continue reading Summer 2014 Offshore Monitoring for Fukushima Contamination

B.C.’s citizen scientists on alert for radiation from Japan

 Amy Smart

Originally Published in the Times Colonist January 24, 2015 10:22 PM

Surfriders collect samples.jpg
Citizen scientists with environmental group Surfriders collect seawater samples off a dock in Port Renfrew. The samples will be analyzed for traces of radiation from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear meltdown. Photo courtesy Craig Wardle

Continue reading B.C.’s citizen scientists on alert for radiation from Japan

Canadian scientists track Pacific Ocean currents… using Fukushima radiation

Scott Sutherland
Meteorologist, theweathernetwork.com

Originally published by The Weather Network

Wednesday, January 7, 2015, 8:09 PM – Radioactive isotopes originating from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan have been slowly drifting across the Pacific Ocean since March 2011, and Canadian scientists have been using this to test some of their most basic ideas of how ocean currents work. Continue reading Canadian scientists track Pacific Ocean currents… using Fukushima radiation

B.C. radiation risk from Fukushima disaster ‘insignificant:’ research

VANCOUVER — The Globe and Mail

Published
Tuesday, Dec. 30 2014, 9:07 PM EST

As radiation from the Fukushima nuclear power-plant disaster drifted across the Pacific, fears that salmon and other marine life could be contaminated spread along the British Columbia coast.

But samples gathered by citizen scientists and a more comprehensive study done by Fisheries and Oceans Canada indicate the levels of radiation are so low they pose almost zero risk to human or ecosystem health. Continue reading B.C. radiation risk from Fukushima disaster ‘insignificant:’ research

Observing the Arrival of the Fukushima Contamination Plume in North American Coastal Waters

By Jay T. Cullen

@JayTCullen and @FukushimaInFORM

This short blog summarizes an open access paper published today reporting results from a Canadian monitoring program tasked with documenting the arrival of ocean borne Fukushima contamination along the North American Pacific coast. This diary is part of an ongoing effort to communicate the best science available on the impacts of the Fukushima Dai-ichi meltdowns on the environment. High quality measurements to look for Fukushima derived radiocesium were made in seawater in the North Pacific and Arctic Oceans from 2011 to early 2014. The authors concluded that:

  1. Fukushima derived radiocesium was first detected 1500 km west of British Columbia Canada in June 2012
  2. Contamination was detected on the continental shelf (near coastal waters) in June 2013
  3. By February 2014 Fukushima radiocesium was present at levels similar to preexisting weapons testing derived 137-Cs
  4. The timing of the arrival and levels of radiocesium in the contaminated plume are in reasonable agreement with existing ocean circulation model predictions
  5. These same models predict that total radiocesium levels from weapons testing fallout and Fukushima will likely reach maximum values of ~3-5 Becquerel per cubic meter (Bq m-3 of seawater in 2015-2016 and then decline to fallout background level of ~1 Bq m-3 by 2021
  6. Fukushima will increase northeastern Pacific water to levels last seen in the 1980’s but does not represent a threat to environmental or human health

Continue reading Observing the Arrival of the Fukushima Contamination Plume in North American Coastal Waters