Tag Archives: British Columbia

Coho Salmon Returning to the Quinsam River on Vancouver Island

By Jay T. Cullen

Eiko Jones is a photographer who specializes in underwater imaging and works out of Campbell River on Vancouver Island in British Columbia. He recently completed a project where he captured a lengthy, high definition video of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) returning to the Quinsam River.

You can read about the technical details of the shoot at Eiko’s blog if you are interested. The video shows these amazing fish completing their life cycle by returning to the natal river to spawn.  Our monitoring project has been collecting coho, other Pacific salmon and marine organisms to look for Fukushima radionuclide contamination and to determine the impact of the disaster on ecosystem and public health.

Enjoy Eiko and his teams work below.

Update on Offshore Seawater Monitoring: Interview with CFAX 1070 AM

Interview with Ian Jessop on CFAX 1070 AM Radio in Victoria about newly published offshore monitoring data from InFORM and our partner project Our Radioactive Ocean.  Interview begins at the 33:50 mark of the Soundcloud file below.

 

Radioactivity In Our Ocean: Fukushima & Its Impact On The Pacific

The following presentation is for those interested in the most recent, scientifically rigorous, monitoring data related to the impact of the Fukushima Dai-ichi disaster on the health of North Pacific Ocean ecosystem and inhabitants of western North America. Last evening, Sept. 14, 2015 Dr. Ken Buesseler and I reported on monitoring efforts through the Fukushima InFORM and Our Radioactive Ocean projects at a public lecture hosted by the Vancouver Aquarium. The presentation was followed by a Question and Answer period and discussion.

Link to the YouTube video is here in case of browser compatibility problems.

Collection of the July 2015 Citizen Science Sample in Prince Rupert

Prince Rupert BC

Prince Rupert’s July 2015 sample was recently collected by our volunteer team at Northwest Community College including visiting science teacher Sandy Humphrey from SD 91. Sampling is being coordinated by Cheryl Paavola (Instructor and Science Lab Tech) at Northwest Community College – Prince Rupert.

Sandy Humphrey of SD 91 collecting the InFORM seawater sample in a very sunny Prince Rupert harbour.
Sandy Humphrey of SD 91 collecting the InFORM seawater sample in a very sunny Prince Rupert harbour.
Sandy Humphrey and Cheryl Paavola at Prince Rupert.
Sandy Humphrey and Cheryl Paavola at Prince Rupert.
The sample will be processed and analyzed for radiocesium and naturally occurring radionuclides.
The sample will be processed and analyzed for radiocesium and naturally occurring radionuclides.

Continue reading Collection of the July 2015 Citizen Science Sample in Prince Rupert

Sampling for Fukushima Derived Radionuclides in the Northeast Pacific and Arctic 2015

By Jay T. Cullen

Bow of the CCGS Laurier. Great ship and crew for science operations in the Arctic.
The purpose of this short post is to update readers on the activities of the Integrated Fukushima Ocean Radionuclide Monitoring (InFORM) project. This post is the most recent in a series documenting scientific research into the impact of the Fukushima Dai-ichi disaster on environmental and public health. Today the icebreaker CCGS Sir Wilfrid Laurier will leave Victoria BC bound for Dutch Harbor Alaska and then up through Bering Sea and Strait to the Arctic Ocean. On the way the InFORM project will collect surface seawater to characterize the distribution of Fukushima derived radionuclides 137-Cesium (137Cs half life ~30 years), and 134-Cesium (134Cs half life ~2 years). As in previous years this information will help to determine how well model predictions of the activities and progression of ocean borne contamination across the Pacific Ocean match with observations. This provides important information on the impact of this contamination on the health of the Pacific ecosystem and the North American public that rely on the ocean for their food, livelihood and recreation. The evolution of the contaminant plume in time and space also helps the scientific community to better understand ocean mixing which is a key parameter toward understanding the oceans role in mitigating atmospheric greenhouse gas increases and climate change. Continue reading Sampling for Fukushima Derived Radionuclides in the Northeast Pacific and Arctic 2015